"Exploring the unmowed corners of the world."

Books by Anita Sanchez

Wait Till It Gets Dark!

It’s night. It’s dark. Time to go indoors—or is it? The outdoors at night can be a scary place. Wait Till It Gets Dark by Anita Sanchez and George Steele will help young readers investigate the mysterious nature of night.

Illustrations by John Himmelman

Discover nighttime landscapes and the nocturnal animals that inhabit them, from desert coyotes to the frog chorus in a backyard pond—and a corner of the bathroom at midnight where a spider lurks…

Can you walk as silently as a fox? Use your night vision like an owl? Follow a scent trail? Filled with activities and ideas, this book invites readers of all ages to explore the mysterious world of their own backyards after dark.

Karl, Get Out of the Garden!

Swine’s snout? Yellow daisy? Dandelion?

 What was the right name? Young Karl Linné wasn’t sure—and neither was anyone else!

Doctors, gardeners, farmers—everybody!—argued about the names of plants and animals. How could scientists communicate if they couldn’t even agree on what to call things? 

Karl knew there was only one solution: to organize and name EVERY LIVING THING in the world. But it was an enormous job. Could he do it?  

He decided to try. Karl created a new language of science—and forever changed the way people saw the world.

 

Karl, Get out of the Garden! is a picture book biography of Carolus Linnaeus. The famous naturalist was a brilliant scientist whose system of binomial nomenclature–two names for each living thing–is still used today. But he started out as a curious little boy with a passion for weeds and bugs. His exuberant, outspoken, and defiant personality makes him a fascinating character.

Illustrations by Catherine Stock

In Praise of Poison Ivy

As a science writer, I’m fascinated by plants and animals that are unloved—like dandelions, tarantulas, and what is perhaps the world’s most hated plant—poison ivy.cover--in praise of poison ivy--sanchez

Millions of people are allergic to poison ivy, which contains one of the most potent toxins on earth. But the astounding paradox is that poison ivy is a plant of immense ecological value. It’s a plant of a powerful plant with a dramatic history and an increasingly important role in the American landscape. For me, poison ivy has served as a lens through which to take a closer look at the green world, and the changes and challenges that face our planet.

In Praise of Poison Ivy is a nonfiction book for adults, which explores the vices and virtues of a powerful plant with a dramatic history and an increasingly important role in the American landscape.

Leaflets Three, Let it Be!: The Story of Poison Ivy is a children’s picture book, designed to help the youngest outdoor explorers both appreciate and avoid poison ivy.

Wild mammals from mice to moose, honeybees and butterflies, woodpeckers, wild turkeys, robins, and bluebirds all defy poison ivy’s nasty nature and feast on its leaves and fruit. Cardinals are even known to line their nests with fuzzy poison ivy rootlets.

Poison ivy and humans have long had a passionate love/hate affair. This book follows the trail of poison ivy as it encounters an engaging cast of historical characters, including explorers, scientists, entrepreneurs and royalty—who all learned about poison ivy the hard way. Despite its irritating qualities, the magnificent scarlet-and-gold autumn foliage of poison ivy has been showcased in the gardens of presidents and kings.

The book includes informational sidebars on identifying poison ivy, how to cope with that insanely itchy rash, and “green” methods of coping with the plant.

Leaflets Three, Let it Be!: The Story of Poison Ivy

A book about poison ivy? Anita Sanchez writes of the surprising virtues of the despised plant in her new children’s book, published by Boyds Mills Press.

Beautiful illustrations by Robin Brickman highlight the amazing variety of wildlife that use poison ivy for food and shelter. And no, they don’t get itchy–only humans are affected by the toxic three leaves. Bees buzz in poison ivy flowers, gathering poison ivy nectar. Cardinals use poison ivy rootlets to line their nests. Insects roll themselves up in a snug blanket of poison ivy leaves while toads hunt and spiders spin webs in the shade. And birds by the dozens come flocking to a poison ivy feast of winter berries.

Anita’s other published books include Mr. Lincoln’s Chair: The Shakers and Their Quest for PeaceThe Invasion of Sandy Bay, and The Teeth of the Lion: The Story of the Beloved and Despised Dandelion.

The Unmowed Blog

The unmowed corners.

That’s where life shoves through, grows to the sun, flourishes.

I stop every time I’m in a parking lot, a schoolyard, a graveyard–anywhere–and see what plants are growing. There’s unintended beauty in the untended places. I look to see what’s pushing through the cracks in the pavement. What the mowers have missed. What the weed whackers have failed to whack.

So come on this journey with me. Examine and rejoice in that which no one else notices.

Stop by often to see what’s going on in the parking lot! Read Unmowed Blog posts here.

Programs

A published author and professional educator, Anita Sanchez has many years of experience in providing classes and hands-on, participatory programs to a wide range of audiences.

The former director of Educational Programming at the Five Rivers Center with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, she has presented classes in schools throughout New England and New York State, and given workshops at the American Museum of Natural History, Colonial Williamsburg, Harvard Natural History Museum, the New York State Museum, and many other libraries, bookstores, museums, and classrooms.

 

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Catch a Falling Leaf

Important information. Spread the word. Can you grasp twelve falling leaves?

Total Eclipse of the Sunflower

In the Year of the Eclipse, I’m looking at sunflowers. No protective eyewear needed.

Edna St. Vincent Millay: Steepletop

Steepletop, a wooded mountain in upstate New York, Edna St. Vincent Millay’s home for twenty-five years.

In Defense of Fuzzy Caterpillars

No need to worry too much about these little guys. Hickory tussock moth caterpillars are not evil.

Katydids: The Nightly Debate

Katydids are calling in endless argument: katy-did, katy-didn’t. Many voices raised in eternal disagreement. Sort of like Congress.

Ulysses S. Grant: A Cottage in the Woods

In his last days, Grant took refuge in an Adirondack Cottage. In this most peaceful of places he wrote the tale of America’s bloodiest war.

On Calling Congress

Calling my elected officials, ugh. I have to take the time, make the time, be stern with myself. Honestly, it’s worse than dieting.

Crabgrass: Green Spider

It’s the closest thing in the plant world to a spider: many-legged, sprawling, sneaky, ubiquitous. Hated.

Herman Melville: Arrowhead

It was here, far from the sea, that Melville wrote the craziest, wordiest, most magnificent novel ever to baffle generations of high school students and send shivers down the spine: Moby Dick.

Cross Creek: Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

Perhaps more than any other writer, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings showed her love of the land in her writing. Trees and flowers flowed all through her pages.

Unmowed Authors

Can plants create great literature? Of course they can, plants can do anything.

Birdsfoot Trefoil: Unmowed

Here’s what can happen when the mower goes AWOL.

Why Hummingbird Feeders Are a Terrible Idea

If you’re going to feed hummingbirds, think carefully about what food you’re offering to these tiny, fragile bodies.

A Hover of Hummingbirds

Want to see hummingbirds? Think red. Think bee balm.