flowers

Birdsfoot Trefoil: Unmowed

Posted by on Aug 18, 2017 in flowers, summer, Unmowed Blog | 0 comments

Birdsfoot Trefoil: Unmowed

Here’s what can happen when the mower goes AWOL.

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A Hover of Hummingbirds

Posted by on Jul 29, 2017 in flowers, summer, Unmowed Blog | 2 comments

A Hover of Hummingbirds

Want to see hummingbirds? Think red. Think bee balm.

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Inspecting a Lemon: Yellow Wood Sorrel

Posted by on Jun 6, 2017 in edible, flowers, spring, Unmowed Blog | 1 comment

Inspecting a Lemon: Yellow Wood Sorrel

When I was a kid, I would taste anything—it’s a wonder I’m still alive, really. I sampled grass, mushrooms, dandelions. But here’s a real treat: wood sorrel.

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Asters in the Badlands

Posted by on Sep 28, 2016 in flowers, summer | 0 comments

Asters in the Badlands

The Badlands. An incredibly arid, but weirdly beautiful landscape.  I often marvel at how plants can shove through cracks in cement or bloom in gravel or sand. But how can any wildflowers blossom in this ash-colored, bone-dry soil? Plants need sun, of course, but here there’s nothing but sun. No trees, no shade at all. Even on a cool day, the constant sun can get to you. After a while you find yourself trying to fit into the three-inch wide shadow cast by a trail marker. Anything to hide from the glare for just a moment. But there’s nowhere for these asters to hide. And apparently, no water....

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Birdsfoot Trefoil: What’s in a Name?

Posted by on Jun 20, 2016 in flowers, summer, Unmowed Blog | 0 comments

Birdsfoot Trefoil: What’s in a Name?

Birdsfoot trefoil. You probably see it on every summer’s day. It’s the froth of little yellow blossoms that line roadways and pop out of sidewalk cracks.

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Bee Balm: Hummingbird Heaven

Posted by on Aug 9, 2015 in birds, flowers, summer, Unmowed Blog, wildlife | 1 comment

Bee Balm: Hummingbird Heaven

Hummingbirds are attracted to the color red. And bee balm is red. Red, red. Fire engine red. Bee balm is a member of the mint family, as can be seen by its squared-off stems and paired leaves; like most mints, it’s hardy, and spreads readily–pretty easy to grow. My kind of plant. It’s a native wildflower–at least it was originally a wildflower, though I’ve never seen it growing in the wild–what I’ve got in my garden is a nursery-bred variety of the original wild plant. And it’s red. Blood red. Hummingbirds, which have keen color vision, are...

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